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Table 4 Significant determinants of breastfeeding duration ≥4 months of CMI, after adjustment for potential confounders (n = 275, Phase 1)

From: Breastfeeding practices 2008–2009 among Chinese mothers living in Ireland: a mixed methods study

 Socio-demographic & Social support and influence ModelaSocial-demographic & Behavioural modelbSocial-demographic & Attitudinal modelcFull Modeld
Adjusted OR
(95% CI)
P valueAdjusted OR
(95% CI)
P valueAdjusted OR
(95% CI)
P valueAdjusted OR
(95% CI)
P value
Mother had been breastfed as a child3.22 (1.21–8.56)0.0193.81 (1.22–11.88)0.021    
Feeding information obtained from mothers’ own mother1.97 (1.08–3.59)0.027      
Child was looked after by maternal grandmother      4.53 (1.21–16.92)0.025
Child was looked after by paternal grandmother0.17 (0.05–0.61)0.007      
Mother bed shared with the baby  3.10 (1.46–6.62)0.003  3.27 (1.32–8.11)0.011
Breastfed within 1st hour after childbirth  2.14 (1.07–4.25)0.030    
Formula was introduced at least 1 week after the child was born  2.81 (1.37–5.77)0.005    
Child was fed on demand  2.68 (1.42–5.05)0.002  2.89 (1.36–6.13)0.006
Mother consumed cultural postpartum diet  2.88 (1.46–5.66)0.002    
Feeding decision was made:
 Before pregnancy vs. After the child was born    4.95 (1.17–20.90)0.030  
 During pregnancy vs. After the child was born    4.61 (1.04–20.44)0.044  
 Planned breastfeeding duration: ≥ 4 months vs. <  4 months    9.66 (4.18–22.31)< 0.00110.09 (3.83–26.61)< 0.001
  1. ‘Full Model’ included all variables (socio-demographic, behavioural, social support and influence, and attitudinal) which have an association with breastfeeding duration (P < 0.15) among CMI, according to the univariate logistic regression analyses
  2. a -2LL = 305.873, df = 16. Non-significant variables that were included but not depicted in this model: mother’s age at time of childbirth, maternal length of Irish residency at time of interview, child’s age, maternal birthplace, mother’s education, husband’s education level, couple’s occupation, husband’s nationality, infant feeding information obtained from antenatal classes, and child was looked after by mother’s own mother
  3. b -2LL = 253.812, df = 19. Non-significant variables that were included but not depicted in this model: mother’s age at time of childbirth, maternal length of Irish residency at time of interview, child’s age, maternal birthplace, husband’s education level, couple’s occupation, husband’s nationality, and mother’ previous breastfeeding experience
  4. c -2LL = 236.114, df = 19. Non-significant variables that were included but not depicted in this model: mother’s age at time of childbirth, maternal length of Irish residency at time of interview, child’s age, maternal birthplace, couple’s education level, couple’s occupation, mother had been breastfed as a child, husband’s nationality, agreement/disagreement with ‘I don‘t like breastfeeding’, ‘formula feeding is more convenient than breastfeeding’, and ‘I would feel embarrassed if someone saw me breastfeeding’, as well as maternal awareness of the advantages of breastfeeding
  5. d -2LL = 200.045, df = 30. Non-significant variables that were included but not depicted in this model: mother’s age at time of childbirth, maternal length of Irish residency at time of interview, child’s age, maternal birthplace, couple’s education level, couple’s occupation, mother had been breastfed as a child, husband’s nationality, infant feeding information obtained from mother’s own mother and antenatal classes, child was looked after by mother’s mother-in-law, timing of the introduction of breast milk and infant formula, mother consumed cultural postpartum diet, past breastfeeding experience, timing of the feeding decision made, agreement/disagreement with ‘I don‘t like breastfeeding’, ‘formula feeding is more convenient than breastfeeding’, and ‘I would feel embarrassed if someone saw me breastfeeding’, as well as maternal awareness of the advantages of breastfeeding