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Table 3 Adjusted regression results for child outcomes

From: Antenatal care as a means to increase participation in the continuum of maternal and child healthcare: an analysis of the poorest regions of four Mesoamérican countries

  ANC Guatemalab Honduras Mexicoc Nicaraguad
OR p OR p OR OR p OR
Postnatal care for baby within 7 days 1–3 ANC visits 2.43 a ** 3.33 ** 1.57   1.86 **
(1.81–3.26) (2.05–5.40) (0.84–2.94) (1.22–2.85)
4 or more ANC visits 6.12 ** 4.81 ** 2.14   4.01 **
(4.68–7.99) (3.20–7.21) (1.26–3.63) (2.77–5.81)
Vitamin A supplements 1–3 ANC visits 0.99   0.76   1.96 * 1.40  
(0.74–1.33) (0.54–1.07) (1.13–3.41) (0.82–2.38)
4 or more ANC visits 1.59 ** 1.30   2.09 * 1.85 **
(1.27–1.99) (0.92–1.83) (1.47–2.99) (1.17–2.93)
Vaccine compliant 1–3 ANC visits 2.37 ** 1.09   0.91   1.49  
(1.69–3.31) (0.67–1.79) (0.51–1.63) (0.94–2.35)
4 or more ANC visits 3.41 ** 1.34   1.15   2.70 **
(2.66–4.37) (0.90–2.01) (0.75–1.76) (1.87–3.89)
  1. * p < 0.05; **p < 0.01
  2. aAll regressions controlled for: maternal education, maternal age category, maternal occupation, parity, marriage status, previous problematic pregnancies, whether the pregnancy was desired, asset score, household expenditure quintile, media exposure, travel time, community health worker visits in the last month, and urbanicity. Models for vitamin A supplements, vaccine compliancy for age, and postnatal care for the baby additionally included controls for the child’s age in months at the time of the survey and the sex of the child
  3. bIn Guatemala, we additionally controlled for indigeneity
  4. cIn Mexico, we additionally controlled for indigeneity and opportunidades participation
  5. dIn Nicaragua, we additionally controlled for indigeneity