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Table 4 Factors associated with male involvement in MNH: Proportional-odds regression models showing unadjusted and adjusted odds ratios, 95 % confidence intervals and probability values (n=203)*

From: Correlates of male involvement in maternal and newborn health: a cross-sectional study of men in a peri-urban region of Myanmar

Independent variable Unadjusted OR 95 % CI† p-value Adjusted OR 95 % CI† p-value
Sociodemographic factors
 Respondent’s age 0.99 0.97 – 1.02 0.616 0.99 0.96 - 1.02 0.481
 Respondent’s wife’s age 1.00 0.97 – 1.03 0.893 1.02 0.98 - 1.06 0.348
Education
 Up to primary 1.00    1.00   
 Middle school 1.33 0.80 – 2.21 0.240 0.72 0.42 – 1.24 0.237
 High school/ university 3.26 2.02 – 5.27 <0.001 1.10 0.57 - 2.12 0.780
Wife’s education
 Up to primary 1.00    1.00   
 Middle school 1.53 0.86 – 2.73 0.130 1.43 0.91 – 2.25 0.116
 High school/university 4.36 2.80 – 6.80 <0.001 3.39 1.90 – 6.15 <0.001
 Number of children 0.81 0.65- 1.01 0.057 0.78 0.63 – 0.95 0.016
Household income (USD/month)
 ≤100 1.00    1.00   
 >100 1.20 0.64 – 2.24 0.527 1.20 0.62 – 2.31 0.591
Knowledge of MNH
 Knowledge score 1.20 1.11 – 1.29 <0.001 1.18 1.10 – 1.27 <0.001
Overall attitude to male role in MNH (attitude scale)
 Unfavourable 1.00    1.00   
 Favourable 1.92 1.16 – 3.17 0.016 1.44 0.93 – 2.23 0.105
  1. * Multivariable model cut-points: k1 = 0.47, k2 = 2.13, k3 = 4.13
  2. † Sandwich variance estimation used to provide appropriate standard errors for village clustering