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Table 7 Midwives’ views of the negative aspects of caseload for midwives

From: Comparing satisfaction and burnout between caseload and standard care midwives: findings from two cross-sectional surveys conducted in Victoria, Australia

Theme Baseline caseload (n = 16) Baseline standard care (n = 110) Total baseline (n = 126) Two year caseload (n = 20) Two year standard care (n = 117) Total survey two (n = 137)
  n % n % n % n % n % n %
On-call (uncertain, unpredictable) 14 88 68 62 82 65 17 85 61 52 78 57
Impact on personal life (social, family, work/life balance) 2 13 28 25 31 25 3 15 18 15 21 15
Demanding role (adjustment, exhausting, stressful, hard to switch off, takes commitment) 6 38 15 14 21 17 1 5 12 10 13 9
Lack of support and respect 2 12 17 15 19 15 3 15 13 11 17 12
Burnout - - 18 16 18 14 - - 4 3 4 3
Challenges of relationships with women (demands, personality conflict) -   14 13 14 11 1 5 4 3 5 4
Long hours 4 25 10 9 14 11 4 20 18 15 22 16
Isolation 1 6 9 8 10 8 3 15 11 9 14 10
Being pioneers (establishing the model, being under scrutiny, implementation) 2 13 6 5 8 6 - - - - - -
Issues with remuneration/annualised salary 1 6 5 5 6 5 2 10 5 4 7 5
Skills and knowledge required 1 6 3 3 4 3 1 5 2 2 3 2
Higher workload in caseload - - 4 4 4 3 - - 5 4 5 4
Increased workload for other midwives (including providing care for caseload women) -   3 3 3 2 - - 19 16 19 14
Issues with team work - - 3 3 3 2 - - 2 2 2 1
Constraints within the hospital (space, rules) 2 13 1 1 3 2 2 10 1 1 3 2
Leave not replaced (sick leave, annual leave) 1 6 1 1 2 2 - - 6 5 6 4
Being unavailable for women - - 1 1 1 1 2 10 12 10 14 10