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Open Peer Review

This article has Open Peer Review reports available.

How does Open Peer Review work?

Systemic delays in the initiation of antiretroviral therapy during pregnancy do not improve outcomes of HIV-positive mothers: a cohort study

  • Landon Myer1Email author,
  • Rose Zulliger2,
  • Linda-Gail Bekker3 and
  • Elaine Abrams4
BMC Pregnancy and Childbirth201212:94

DOI: 10.1186/1471-2393-12-94

Received: 12 June 2012

Accepted: 6 September 2012

Published: 11 September 2012

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Open Peer Review reports

Pre-publication versions of this article and author comments to reviewers are available by contacting info@biomedcentral.com.

Original Submission
12 Jun 2012 Submitted Original manuscript
Resubmission - Version 2
Submitted Manuscript version 2
18 Jul 2012 Reviewed Reviewer Report - Emanuele Nicastri
23 Jul 2012 Reviewed Reviewer Report - Daniel Westreich
22 Aug 2012 Author responded Author comments - Landon Myer
Resubmission - Version 3
22 Aug 2012 Submitted Manuscript version 3
22 Aug 2012 Reviewed Reviewer Report - Emanuele Nicastri
30 Aug 2012 Reviewed Reviewer Report - Daniel Westreich
1 Sep 2012 Author responded Author comments - Landon Myer
Resubmission - Version 4
1 Sep 2012 Submitted Manuscript version 4
Publishing
6 Sep 2012 Editorially accepted
11 Sep 2012 Article published 10.1186/1471-2393-12-94

How does Open Peer Review work?

Open peer review is a system where authors know who the reviewers are, and the reviewers know who the authors are. If the manuscript is accepted, the named reviewer reports are published alongside the article. Pre-publication versions of the article and author comments to reviewers are available by contacting info@biomedcentral.com. All previous versions of the manuscript and all author responses to the reviewers are also available.

You can find further information about the peer review system here.

Authors’ Affiliations

(1)
Centre for Infectious Diseases Epidemiologic Research, School of Public Health & Family Medicine, University of Cape Town
(2)
Department of Health, Behavior & Society, Johns Hopkins Bloomberg School of Public Health
(3)
Desmond Tutu HIV Centre, Institute of Infectious Diseases & Molecular Medicine, University of Cape Town
(4)
ICAP, Mailman School of Public Health & College of Physicians & Surgeons, Columbia University

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